THE BASSET HOUND
Illustrated Standard

(AUSTRALIAN BREED STANDARD AND EXTENSION)


  ESSENCE OF THE BREED
  CHARACTERISTICS   GENERAL APPEARANCE  
  TEMPERAMENT     HEAD AND SKULL     EYES     EARS     MOUTH     NECK  
  FOREQUARTERS     BODY     HINDQUARTERS     FEET     TAIL     GAIT/MOVEMENT  
  FORM & FUNCTION     COAT     COLOUR     SIZE     HISTORY     ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS  

Drawings from the Japanese Illustrated Standard by Yoko Yamamoto



BODY

Long and deep throughout length, breast bone prominent but chest neither narrow nor unduly deep. There should be adequate clearance between the lower part of the chest and the ground to allow the hound to move freely over all types of terrain. Ribs well rounded and sprung, without flange, extending well back. Back rather broad; withers and quarters of approximate same height, though loins may arch slightly. Back from withers to inset of quarters not unduly long.


Nicely balanced. Note topline, balanced angles and tail set.
Remember … The rear of the hound is built for speed… the front is built to slow him down.

Correct Balance In The Hound


Correct proportion Approximately twice as long as tall.

  • Figure A: Shows correct proportion – approximately twice as long from the point of the sternum to the point of the buttocks as it is tall at the withers.
  • Figure B is cobby (short).
  • Figure C is too long.
  • Figure D is leggy. “the distance from the deepest point of the chest to the ground should not to be more than 1/3 the total height at the withers of an adult Basset.”


Forequarters and hindquarters should be approximately the same width when viewed from above.


Incorrect Balance
Shoulders are wider
than the hindquarters.

Correct Balance
Hindquarters and shoulders
are approximately equal in width.


Male

Female

These are correct Hounds. They are balanced yet substantial in bone. All parts fit smoothly into one another without being overdone.

More Top winning Basset Hounds over the years


The Hound Ribcage

The rib structure is long, smooth and extends well back. The ribs are well-sprung, allowing adequate room for heart and lungs. slabsides and flanged ribs (bumpy) are faults.

A Short Keel – A problem in the Basset   In addition to feeling the length and smoothness of the ribcage, judges should also put their hands on the length of the keel, which runs between the forelegs and extends back toward the abdomen. This bone should run about 4 inches/10cms behind the forelegs. Good length is necessary to protect the heart and lungs.


The Topline

Due to his length of body, it is particularly important that the Hound have a good, level topline. Topline strength comes from length of rib, not the loin.

 
The above dogs have good toplines

Due to his length of body, it is particularly important that the Hound have a good, level topline. Topline strength comes from length of rib, not the loin.

The loin is the only area of the back that does not receive structural support. A soft topline results from weakened back muscles, too long a loin or incorrect shoulder lay, causing a dip behind withers.


HINDQUARTERS

Full of muscle and standing out well, giving an almost spherical effect when viewed from rear. Stifles well bent. Hocks well let down and slightly bent under but turn neither in nor out and just under body when standing naturally. Some wrinkles of skin may appear between hock and foot, and at rear of joint a slight pouch of skin may be present, but on no account should any of these be excessive.

Correct Hindquarter Angulation

When the hocks are set at a right angle to the ground, viewed from the side, they are well behind the dog and show a distinct bend of stifle.


When viewed from the rear, the hocks are to be parallel with each other and almost straight down from the broad, well muscled hindquarters.

NB: Hindquarter faults in the Hound are similar to those found in other breeds.

  • Cowhocked
  • Bowed
  • Poorly angulated
  • Close


FEET

Large, well knuckled up and padded. Forefeet may point straight ahead or be turned slightly outwards but in every case hound always stands perfectly true, weight being born equally by toes with pads together so that feet would leave an imprint of a large hound and no unpadded areas in contact with ground.


TAIL

(Stern) well set on, rather long, strong at base, tapering, with moderate amount of coarse hair underneath. When moving, stern carried well up and curving gently, sabre-fashion, never curling or gay.

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Illustrated Standard prepared by Judy Horton – (All Breeds judge) for the VicJudge’s website Australia
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