THE BASSET HOUND
Illustrated Standard

(AUSTRALIAN BREED STANDARD AND EXTENSION)

ESSENCE OF THE BREED
CHARACTERISTICS GENERAL APPEARANCE
TEMPERAMENT HEAD AND SKULL EYES EARS MOUTH NECK
FOREQUARTERS BODY HINDQUARTERS FEET TAIL GAIT/MOVEMENT
FORM & FUNCTION COAT COLOUR SIZE HISTORY ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

Drawings from the Japanese Illustrated Standard by Yoko Yamamoto



HEAD AND SKULL

Domed with some stop & occipital bone prominent, of medium width at brow and tapering slightly at muzzle, general appearance at foreface lean not snipey. Top of muzzle nearly parallel with line from stop to occiput & not much longer than head from stop to occiput. There may be a moderate amount of wrinkle at brow and beside eyes. In any event skin of head loose enough as to be wrinkled noticeably when drawn forward or when head is lowered. Flews of upper lip overlap lower substantially. Nose entirely black except in light coloured hounds, when it may be brown or liver. Large and well open nostrils may protrude a little beyond lips.


Male Head

Female Head

These are correct Basset Hound heads. The distance from nose to stop and stop to occiput is approximately equal. The skin is noticeably wrinkled over the brow when the head is lowered. Note the folds at the side of the face, the deep heavy muzzle and the slightly sunken eyes.

This description of the HEAD below is taken from George Johnston’s “The Basset Hound”.

The modern standards do not call for narrow or wrinkled heads; all three specify that skulls should be of medium width. The French Standard does not even mention the word “wrinkle”, and the British and American versions ask for a moderate amount to be noticeable only when drawn forward. No hard and fast rule can be laid down about the width of skull; obviously a large dog hound needs a stronger skull than a very sweet and smaller female, and it is therefore a question of the head being in proportion to the body.

Viewed from the front the outline of the head should resemble an elongated “V” or wedge shape widening from the nose to the rear of the skull and the deep side of the skull should be devoid of any cheek bumps or muscle, and the whole skull should have a fleshless appearance. Looking from the side, the head should be of an approximately oblong outline. The flews should be deep, hanging down under the nose and coming over the bottom jaw and continuing back, gradually deepening to blend with the loose skin under the neck. A dry neck is a fault. The topline of the skull should be formed of a line from nose to stop, then a moderately defined stop and then a line from stop to the occipital bone. The two lines run parallel and are roughly the same length. A dish faced look caused by the same line sloping from nose into too deep a stop is a bad fault.


EYES

Lozenge shaped neither prominent nor too deep set, dark but may shade to mid brown in light coloured hound. Expression calm and serious. Red of lower lid appears thou not excessively. Light or yellow eye highly undesirable.

The eyes are lozenge or diamond shaped, caused by the looseness of the lower eyelids (haw). Excessive haw is highly undersible.


EARS

Set on Low, just below line of eye. Long, reaching well beyond end of muzzle of correct length, but not excessively so. Narrow through their length and curling well inwards , very supple, fine and velvety in texture

The ears of the Basset Hound are narrow throughout their length, very fine and velvety. They are set on low and fall in graceful folds, the lower parts curling inwards and backwards.

MOUTH

Jaws strong, with a perfect, regular and complete scissor bite, i.e. upper teeth closely overlapping lower teeth and set square to the jaws.

Go to next page …. The Body

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Illustrated Standard prepared by Judy Horton – (All Breeds judge) for the VicJudge’s website Australia
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